(Final!) day 6

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For my 6th and final post, I wanted to try something a little different. I was curious about how difficult it would be for a parent to seek out the therapy technologies I’ve been learning about themselves and wanted to see how they would go about their search. I also wanted to find ways that I could help parents in the future with finding these resources. I ended up going to Pinterest and Twitter and doing specific searches to see what was out there as far as speech therapy technology for home use goes. What I found was this:

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My search began on Pinterest, and I ended up finding a great account with helpful resources for doing speech therapy with technology in the home. The board is found here: http://www.pinterest.com/pammyz/slp-tech-apps/ . This board mostly consists of a lot of helpful apps, and most of them have some sort of tutorial. Finding this resource made me think about how I could use Pinterest as an SLP in the future. Making a board with resources for parents would be really helpful for them to see what they can use to work with their children. I could pin a few different websites, games, or app ideas for parents to look through and determine what they feel they can use at home.

 

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The next site I ventured to is Twitter. For me, Twitter was a little bit more difficult to navigate just because there is so much being said and so much information being tweeted. That being said, because of the abundance of information Twitter can be a good resource for finding out things you’re wanting to know more about. By searching #SLP technology I found many tweets featuring types of technology available. One helpful account that I found was @SpeechTechie. This account is pretty popular and regularly tweets innovative ways that technology can be used in speech therapy. For example, one of his latest tweets was about an American Girl speech therapy app. Keeping up with accounts like this one would definitely keep any SLP and parent up to date with what technologies are being used. As an SLP in the future, I could use twitter to tweet and retweet different technologies that I find useful. If parents were to follow me, I could help them narrow down their choices for home therapy and make twitter a little less overwhelming and a more beneficial resource for them.

Day 5

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For my fifth post, I decided to give Youtube a try and see if any speech therapists have videos that take a position on using technology for speech therapy in the home. What I found was this really informative video about apps that can be used to help younger children with speech therapy: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rqyRAFRfwik . The apps that these SLPs suggest can be used both by the speech therapist as well as by parents at home. The therapists explained toward the end of the video that technology these days is seen as an incentive for kids. By moving toward therapy that can be done on an iPad with a parent, kids might be more excited about practicing their speech without even realizing it.

While I personally like all five of the apps that they mention, my favorites are the “Kids at Home” and the “Articulation Station” apps. “Kids at Home” is great because like the SLPs mentioned in the video, kids can practice labeling objects in the home and start expressing themselves. In addition, if a parent can’t understand a child’s needs the child can point to the object they want. “Articulation Station” is really interesting to me because it breaks down the therapy into three levels: word level, sentence level, and story level. Parents can work with their kids at whichever level they’re at and provide supplemental help in the home.

One of the speech therapists in the video mentioned that these apps are really great because they give kids extra help at home, which is important because speech therapy is generally only administered to kids for an hour a week. I feel like this video is a really good resource for me to see more of the technology available and what other SLPs think of its use.